Book Spoilers – What Is A Spoiler? What´s Not A Spoiler?

WARNING: This article is about book spoilers. 


“Don´t spoil the story!”

“I don´t want to hear it!”

“Great. Now I don´t need to read the story because you spoiled it for me.” 


Book spoilers. There´s nothing more a reader hates. To have a story spoiled for them.

book spoiler


That´s a book spoiler. Pretty informative, right? You know exactly what a book spoiler is. But you don´t, really. Because book spoilers aren´t necessarily book spoilers.

Believe it or not- Readers have their own definition of a book spoiler.

But who get´s to decide what an actual book spoiler is, and what´s not? Is revealing an insignificant piece of info enough to be considered a spoiler? Is explaining a story a spoiler?

I think it´s obvious that revealing an end scene / the end of a book is considered a major spoiler. That´s just ruining it right on the spot.

But the rest? Who is the judge of what a true spoiler is or not?

If you want an answer from off the top of my head I´d say that it depends on the person / reader. Some readers don´t mind when a review reveals minor details and some go completely ballistic when a tiny bit of detail is mentioned. It´s a matter of opinion- Like everything else is.

I´ve been reading more often, than not, how readers don´t want to be spoiled. Something I completely understand and respect. But what I don´t understand is:

Why attempt to read a book review if you don´t want to be spoiled?

Has anyone ever thought of book spoilers as book teasers? Because book teasers are often included in reviews, too. Let´s see what the definition of a book teaser is:

book teaser

Oh-HO! This means a book spoiler isn´t actually any different from a book teaser. Technically- A book teaser is a spoiler. It reveals an aspect of a story others would have found out themselves, for sure.

Book teasers come in a few forms: Graphic quotes ( a line taken from said book included with a lovely fitting graphic), excerpts, or book teasers can be built in reviews ( 3 lines that are enough to tickle a reader but not enough to full spoil the story). Funnily enough- teasers ( in all their many forms) are excepted.  But it´s not okay to reveal a spoiler? I´m confused.

I´m a book blogger. That means, I read a book and then I write a review that´s hopefully helpful for those who are looking for their next read. I include the following in my reviews:

  • Title, author, special features in form of graphics ( e.g maps, book cover, gif )
  • Plot summaries ( If needed. Sometimes the synopsis, provided by the author / publisher, goes into great detail )
  • A one – liner ( One-liners can be used for quick social media posts that could hook a reader )
  • Including useful info   (Main characters. Were they credible? Which were my favorite characters. )
  • Personal experiences ( Was I able to relate to the characters? Did I experience a similar event as the characters?)
  • My opinion ( Did I like the book? What was my favorite / least favorite part/ scene?)
  • My recommendation ( Would I recommend said book? And to whom would I / would I not recommend said book?)

The above are what I try to include in all my reviews. Sometimes, a book doesn´t allow me to add all at. Sometimes emotions play a bigger role and over rule everything else. But one thing I try my best to do is: Not to reveal, what I think could be, spoilers.

That´s harder to accomplish than one would think.

When I write my reviews I take my time to think of what can be seen as a spoiler and what not. I read the book´s synopsis twice before adding a plot summary ( because who wants to repeat what´s already available, right?). I sit and wonder and ponder and break my little head over words and sentences. My biggest problem is not how to write a review- It´s about what information I can include to avoid someone telling me that my review contains spoilers.


These days, I feel like I should include a spoiler warning in all my reviews. You just never know who´s going to spot something they consider a spoiler. And I do add spoiling warnings.

I want my reviews to be read. I mean- That´s why I´m spending my free time writing and publishing them in the first place.

Other bloggers want the same thing- For readers to read their reviews.

How does a book blogger recommend a book without revealing a tiny, itsy bitsy piece of detail about a story? Because when I read a review where someone just repeats the synopsis and doesn´t give me something more, other than a “I really enjoyed this book / I loved this read.” then I will hop on to the next review that hopefully has something more convincing. I would rather read something I don´t already know. I need that little convincing push.

A book blogger not only writes a review. In that moment when a book blogger publishes their review they recommend a product. They want others to see WHY they´re recommending the product. They want you to know HOW they came to love / hate the product. They want you to find out WHAT is so special. No one wants to buy the whole cow, but everyone wants a taste of the milk first. They want to know if a product would be something they´d also like or dislike. If a review is so diplomatic and 100% neutral then I, as a reader, have no flipping clue what a book is about. In that moment, I don´t need to waste my time with a review and can stick to reading the synopsis until I turn blue and purple.

So, my question still stands: What is considered a book spoiler?

I´ve talked to alot of people and have learned that many despise any type of book spoiler. Which is fine. To each is their own, I say. But in that moment where you´re talking books with someone, face to face, who doesn´t like spoilers… you´re completely handicapped.

“Don´t spoil anything.” They say, often in a frantic, slightly louder voice. ( as if saying that in a normal tone wouldn´t work as well. Lol)

Well, if that doesn´t kill a conversation on the spot then I don´t what does. So you find other ways to try to convince your friend / family member / neighbor to buy the book that´s REALLY good.

“It´s a great book.” You say and you leave it at that because your hands are tied. Conversation = Over

On to the next subject which is usually food. * insert laugh*

Book conversations are safe when both parties have finished reading the same book. But, recommending a book is just as much fun as discussing the aftermath.

Personally, I don´t mind spoilers. I actually belong to those people who can listen to someone rave about a complete story in great detail and I´d STILL want to read the book.

I can literally hear you all holding your breath and see you shaking your heads now. But I truly don´t mind spoilers at all. Why? Because everyone perceives a story differently. Everyone explains a story differently. I might envision something entirely different.

For me, there are 3 different types of book spoilers:

  1. Minor Spoiler –  This is where a review adds a little more detail about the story than the synopsis has already revealed. A minor spoiler does not reveal the story.
  2. Random Opinion – This could be anything from quoting a piece of a dialogue to ranting about what a certain character has done to evoke stong feelings from a reader. Random opinions do not influence my book purchase.
  3. Major Spoiler- This is where something highly significant is revealed, such as: sickness/illness, plot twists / game changers, ending scene. Anything that can actually ruin a story for someone.


I understand the concept of spoiling. I also understand and respect others when I´m told not to spoil a book. I would never go against someone´s wishes.

There´s a fine way to avoid spoiling ANYTHING for ANYONE. It´s called “giving a spoiler warning” beforehand. Two words- that´s all it takes to make the world safe for spoiler haters. spoilers

That way, the person reviewing a book can always wash their hands in innocence. It takes a few sublte words to make a major impact on a bloggers reputation. Because no one likes to be thought of as the one who ALWAYS spoils.

So, after all that´s been said… I think it´s safe to say and to point out that whatever a reviewer does, it´s always wrong. Or always right ( depending on a person´s perspective).

This article is dedicated to those who hate spoilers and to those who spoil. You are both loved.






Project: Book Bloggers Connected

There´s nothing more satisfying and frustrating than book bloggers. We´re like witches who can create fabulous magic but we can also be vicious little turds and crush anything with a few words.

Book Bloggers are a cruel lot.

They´re the people who give worthy or worthless opinions on books. They´re the people who authors rely on alot.

Book bloggers have an invisible power, you see. These people can work some serious magic and make new friends along the way.

I was at my favorite bookstore the other day. And as always, a sales lady walked up to me and started recommending books.

That moment, I felt an incredible sense of joy because I realized we were book blogging, face to face. Call it: Indirect book blogging ( because book blogging happens mainly on the internet).

We had a nice chat. Swapped ideas, likes and dislikes… We talked about the popular genres and how much they influence the book world.

One thing led to another and somehow we ended up exchanging social media links.

Mind you, our personal reading tastes went in complete opposite directions yet we still found we had more in common than not.

The love and appreciation for books. 

That´s when an idea hit me.

If book bloggers can meet on a neutral ground and discuss the rights and wrongs of the book world without making the discussion into a piss contest… Why not offer a neutral ground, a platform for book bloggers to connect!

The problem with the already existing book blogger groups / forums / chat rooms are:

There aren´t enough discussions and opportunities for bloggers. It´s always about pimping author X and making sure that author Y gets more exposure.

But what book blogger´s needs? What about sharing experiences or talking about the latest, wackiest book accessories?

That´s why I brought Book Bloggers Connected to life.

Book Bloggers Connected is a place where book bloggers are invited to chat about blogging and even create discussions ( light or deep, all are welcome ) for other fellow book bloggers. 


If you happen to be a book blogger then feel free to join the Facebook group!

If you aren´t a book blogger but you know quite a few that might be interested in joining – add them! Spread the word!

Book bloggers are fun people who love to interact! Let´s get all in one place!





Why Book Reviews Aren´t What They Should Be

I think it’s safe to say that alot of people know what book reviews are, so no use to give a deeper explanation for that term.

But what is a review for?

Well, to keep this simple- reviews are there for indecisive people who search for a good book to read( and to help authors with sales ).Or, sometimes not help them ( depending on the reviews content). Either way- reviews are important. ( read 5 Reasons Why Book Reviews Are Important )

But, did you know reviews can also be corrupt? Oh, yes. Quite so.

There are 2 major types of reviews.

1 )reviews

2 ) do-me-a-favor-reviews / help-me-climb-the-ladder-to-success-reviews

Confusing? It shouldn’t be. An author usually has a goal, and that is to make a living off of writing and that’s perfectly fine. If it were up to me I’d wish everyone the success they want. Unfortunately, the road to that success can be a rocky one. There’s so much to do to get „out there”. Writing a book and hoping for a miracle to happen doesn’t cut it anymore.

 Writing a book and hoping for a miracle to happen doesn't cut it anymore

Authors/ writers depend on one major thing- positive feedback. The more positive feedback they get the better their chances are for more exposure. Word can spread really fast and that helps loads.

(Uugh…this is boring……* head against table * )

I like to say I’m a skilled book ninja. I have my eyes and ears all over the place, especially in the indie-author community. When blogging I keep an eye on all sorts of stuff, such as: new book releases, blog tours, author streetteams, yada yada yada, AND reviews. Yes. I read reviews, too. And due to my ninja observation skills I know who’s besties with who and who’s fan #1. If you take a closer look I’m sure you’ll notice, too. 

Can anyone remember the shitstorm Amazon caused with their taking down reviews from certain books? Yes. That was a thing and it pissed so many people off. I would know. I witnessed it, first hand. Amazon never took any of my reviews down ( Thank God ) but they did with other bloggers and fans. And guess what? Bravo! It was about time. Not that I´m pointing fingers at anyone in particular. I´m sure many deleted Amazon reviews were wrongly accused of diabolical review-washing. But the majority? Serves them right. 

I’m positive that won’t win me any plus points. But I don’t really care. When I hunt for books I’m just an ordinary reader. And when I notice someone is just doing an author a favor my blood pressure rises. How am I to trust these people who devote their lives to these authors? Their judgement is clouded in so many ways that their reviews aren’t trustworthy anymore.

Sure, I’m all for supporting my favorite authors. But stay realistic. Stay professional.

I’ve seen people befriend authors ( mainly through Facebook ) and get really REALLY tight with them ( again…that’s fine. Anything that floats their boats). And then I’ve seen those authors publish book after book after book and each book got the same LOVE as the ones before, by the same people. An author can write 12 books ( each with different stories ) in a year and still, they’d get 12 outstanding reviews from the same blogs who are oh-so-tight with them. Something is totally fishy there. There is no way a person will LOVE everything an author writes. No-ho! 

It’s impossible. There always a slower book in-between great books. A story that, in truth, deserved 3 stars because it was, in fact, slower, or a bit more softer, or just not someone´s cup of tea. Any normal thinking person would rate the slower book with 3 stars ( or less) because that’s how they actually felt about the story, no matter how much they loved the authors other books. But, nooooooo.Some bloggers / fans feel so much loyalty towards an author that they feel compelled to give the slower book 5 stars.

Why does that happen? Do readers/ bloggers think their friendship will go down the drain if they’re honest? Or does it have anything to do with stupidity? I. Don’t. Know! You tell me. But something is definitely not right there.

I’m not sure if that can be considered as healthy behavior.

Would you like to know what helps me pick a book? I skip all the 5 star reviews and jumped right to the 3 or fewer ones. I’m not saying that all high rated reviews are full of shit, but can you blame me for doubting them? Reading a 3 star review will not convince me NOT to buy a book because tastes are different. It’s as simple as that.

I know I shouldn’t waste my time breaking my little head over the review matter, because it’s really not worth it. Reviews are… subjective. I’ve wasted so much energy trying to figure out why bloggers aren’t fully honest with their thoughts regarding a book * sigh *. But you’ve got to see my point of view, here- I want to read a book and the only way not to dive blind into a story is to read reviews and see how others judged a book. And people who do authors those stupid favors ( because they want recognition or what not) aren’t helping me, or any other book nerd out there.

That’s basically why I was happy about the Amazon clean-out.

The book universe is sometimes a dark place. Bloggers doing authors favors because they’re afraid to jeopardize their friendship is not okay. 

There was a time, way back in the early blogging days, when bloggers helped authors get reviews by doing so called blog tours for their favorite writers. Blog tours are nothing other than a virtual book promotion where often free copies of a story were/are offered. The only thing wrong with those blog tours were / are… a reviewer CANNOT publish a review with less than 3 stars, depsite what their true thoughts of said book were/are. Anything to avoid a bad review. So, a reviewer either lies or they don´t review at all and risk a potential shout out from the blog tour hosts. I call that…. corrupt. And wrong.
Another observation I made:
Authors releasing new books and bluntly asking for 5 star reviews. Because a 4 star review isn´t going to make sales. * holding breath * The same authors then wonder why hardly any people leave reviews.  That screams desperate.

This is also the main reason why I believe honesty is the best policy. State your real opinions instead of doing favors. 

And for the authors who are hungry for fame….. The big shot writers often have alot of negative reviews along with the 5 stars. That´s definitely something to think about.

It´s amazing to watch authors and their devoted fans go to such extremes. But it´s less amazing when you spot the lie.

I feel cheated on. Ripped off.